The US will equip border agents with body cameras for supervision

US will equip border agents with body cameras for supervision

Based on the privacy assessment, recordings of illegal activities, use of force or misconduct by officers could be used as evidence in investigations or legal proceedings.

The United States will require thousands of border agents to wear body cameras, according to two officials and government documents, a major change that could heighten the supervision of agents and also help capture criminal activity.

The cameras are expected to be deployed in parts of Texas and New Mexico during the boreal summer and later in Arizona, California, Vermont and Texas’ busy Rio Grande Valley in the fall and winter, according to a recent government assessment of how the devices could affect privacy.

Pro-immigrant activists will likely welcome increased oversight from an agency that some have criticized for excessive use of force and institutional racism.

union of border patrol agents also supports the cameras, saying they could help criminal investigations and show that agents are acting professionally.

The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups have called on the Border Patrol to use cameras to improve accountability in the wake of several deadly shootings by law enforcement agencies in the past decade.

Brandon Judd, president of the National Border Patrol Council, stressed that agents should have access to recordings, even when an agent is accused of wrongdoing.

“There is no way to erase the recordings, there is no way to manipulate them, so there is no reason for agents not to have access,” he said in an interview.

The Border Patrol’s parent agency, Customs and Border Protection (CBP), is the largest law enforcement agency in the United States, posing a unique challenge for the collection and storage of video recordings.

Based on the privacy assessment, recordings of illegal activities, use of force or misconduct by officers could be used as evidence in investigations or legal proceedings.

The cameras could offer a new vision of police surveillance on the southern border, where immigration arrests have reached the highest in recent months in the last 20 years and encounters sometimes occur in remote areas.